Online forum: Public engagement in fragile settings

(Please note that this is an archived post, kept up for information purposes, and links to tools or resources that may no longer be live.)

There’s a huge amount of interest in “inclusive” approaches in fragile and conflict-affected settings, but not many practical examples. What’s feasible in tough environments? And where can we find some good practice?

Online forum: Public engagement in fragile settings 2018-03-06T13:58:18+00:00

Be more inclusive now: Steps to bring more stakeholders to the table in fragile states

Political inclusivity is the theme of the moment. We’ve seen it driving populist movements from the Philippines to the United States; underlying the “Brexit” debacle in the United Kingdom; and weaving through the UN’s recent reviews of its peacekeeping and peacebuilding work.

But what does it mean for peacekeepers and development specialists that have grown up in a government-to-government world?

Be more inclusive now: Steps to bring more stakeholders to the table in fragile states 2018-03-06T14:04:23+00:00

The two big challenges to genuine partnerships between international agencies and local actors

The “local” is increasingly fetishized in peacekeeping and conflict resolution circles. The UN’s recent high-level reviews of peacekeeping and peacebuilding pushed hard for “people-centred” approaches, as against traditional models of leadership by the national government.

The two big challenges to genuine partnerships between international agencies and local actors 2018-03-06T14:10:14+00:00

Round table: “Local engagement”

The November round table for the London Conflict / Fragility group focused on the current trend for all things “local” in the fragile states sector.

We heard some really interesting inter-disciplinary perspectives on the topic, of which a few highlights for me personally:

Round table: “Local engagement” 2018-01-09T13:57:22+00:00

If you’re blaming “coordination”, you’re probably missing the real problem

It has become a sacred truth that fragmentation holds back peacebuilding. Integration, coherence, and whole-of-government are good. Silos, turf wars, and tactics-without-strategy are bad.

Yet we have seen a full decade of initiatives to blow up silos, and the ambitions that we held at the beginning have not been realised. In fact, it is difficult to resist the conclusion that we have gotten better at collaborating on certain specific tasks, but failed to change much at all at the policy level.

If you’re blaming “coordination”, you’re probably missing the real problem 2018-01-09T13:57:32+00:00
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